jump to navigation

Few Comments from Lessees on New Lease Accounting as Comment Deadline Approaches December 13, 2010

Posted by Bob Cook in Financial Planning & Analysis, Lease Accounting.
Tags: , , ,
trackback

In August of this year, FASB and IASB jointly issued an “Exposure Draft on Leases”, outlining proposed new lease accounting.  This proposed accounting differs significantly from present accounting, most notably by putting all leases on balance sheets.  The new accounting will affect both lessees and lessors.

The proposed accounting is not without controversy.  While there is no strong, informed argument against putting leases on the balance sheet, there are such arguments against some of the details of the proposed accounting … for example, the requirement to capitalize “likely” lease payments, taking into account options to renew, as opposed to just capitalizing contractual obligations.  This provision, in particular, has elicited much outrage at real estate industry forums.

The accounting boards are receiving comments on the proposed accounting until December 15, just a couple days from now.  Comment letters received by the boards are posted on their websites.  So far, a little over 100 letters have been posted.

The surprising thing: very few of the letters come from big-name companies with large lease portfolios.    In fact, by my count, only three of the Fortune 500 companies have commented thus far; only one is in the top 400 and none are retailers, whose balance sheets will be hit significantly by the new accounting.

Now, it’s possible that more companies have submitted and the boards just haven’t posted them yet, but still … three letters from Fortune 500 companies is an incredibly small number to have been posted at this late date, given the controversy surrounding the proposal.  While a slew of comment letters might be forthcoming over the next few days, one would think that companies would have wanted to get their letters in early so other companies could follow their lead, by reiterating their comments.

It appears that the corporate real estate community, which has a strong stake in the outcome of the new accounting, has not been very successful in getting companies to raise the points of concern that have been the subject of industry forums.   Was it lack of true concern?  Inability to influence within the corporation?  Unfamiliar terrain?

To see my previous posts on the new accounting, including my recommendations for comment letters, click here.

Advertisements

Comments»

No comments yet — be the first.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s